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have the capacity as a u.s. military to have policy as well. that's a global capability. but that means that they respected the choices that are made by other powers we want to sustain a presence in the asia-pacific. same to is the middle east. as you look at these different areas i think that there are terrific opportunist who engage with china on each of them. and to fundamentally ask the question and try to answer the question secretary clinton and state counselors have been engaging for some time, and that is can we get a better answer than we have had in the past two how a new rise in power comes to the international system. and can we do so without running significant risks or indeed fall into conflict. >> thanks. please. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary has said your, and, in fact, admiral sam locklear underscore those pushes a couple days ago in australia. talking about engagement and that strategic trust. but it's interesting that the chinese tend to look at the american, ma asia pacific give it a sort of a continuing strategy. which speaks to the inability to real
deliver a major boost to u.s. economic growth. i realize that many of our colleagues have different priorities when it comes to fixing our broken immigration system, but the reforms contained in the stem jobs act enjoy bipartisan support. so i would urge my colleagues, let's show the world that we can agree on this common sense, bipartisan immigration reform. let's do something for our economy and let's take this first step in our broken -- solving our broken immigration system. now, let me say, before i turn the floor over to my colleague from kentucky, who i know has some comments on this topic, let me address two issues quickly and that is, i can anticipate hearing from some of our colleagues, this doesn't solve all of what's broken in our immigration system and i concede that that's correct. but what we need more than anything is to develop some confidence-building measures for the american people to demonstrate that we can come together, republicans and democrats alike, and do what needs to be done, which everybody -- almost everybody agrees is common sense, and then we can fol
a collaborative flee to support the u.s. efforts and what is a very challenging and dynamic security humanitarian and diplomatic context. thank you very much for your testimony. we will take a brief break while the second panel comes. >> we would like to now turn to the second panel one today's hearing about mali and the path forward. our second panel will include mr. niikwao akuetteh and joining us live this is our first attempt at live testimony by google [inaudible] i suspect nobody has testified by this, the thing i didn't know existed. so my thanks to the technical assistance and the policy support of several very capable folks who made this happen. dr. fomunyoh you may begin and we appreciate your testimony today >> thank you, chairman to an and ranking member isaacson pivot on behalf of the national democratic institute, have the opportunity to discuss the political developments in mali. today crisis is two-thirds of the country which is humanitarian and has admitted for under 50,000 people. the political uncertainty in the capitol and the severe food shortage that is affecting the entire
the state department released a review of the attack on the u.s. consulate benghazi and found, could come systemic failures and leadership management deficiencies. just after the report was released, as to state departments testified about the attack before the house foreign affairs committee. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] the committee will come to order. after recognizing myself and the ranking member for seven minutes each for our opening statement we will then hear from our witnesses, deputy secretary william burns and deputy secretary tom, no strangers to what is we can allow the members to question our witnesses correctly as soon as possible we will forgo additional billing statements and instead i will recognize each member for six minutes following the presentation by the witnesses fought secretary clinton was scheduled to be here today but we have had to reschedule if her parents do to the unfortunate injury for which we wish her a speedy and healthy recovery. she has a confirmed once again she has every intention of testifying before our committee by mid ja
of judge paul william grimm of maryland to be a u.s. district judge for the district of maryland. i'm very proud of the process that senator mikulski has instituted for us making recommendations to the president to fill judicial appointments. i believe that under this process, we have reached to get the very best to recommend to the president and then to our colleagues for confirmation, and judge grimm clearly falls within this line. the senate judiciary committee favorably reported judge grimm's nomination by voice vote on june 7 of this year. judge grimm was nominated to fill the vacancy in maryland that was created when u.s. district judge benson e.laig took senior status in june. judge grimm brings a wealth of experience to this position. early in his career, he served in the military in the judge advocate corps handling commercial litigation in private practice and served as assistant attorney general of maryland. he also sat as a federal magistrate judge in maryland for 15 years. judge grimm was born in japan and received his undergraduate degree from the university of california in
the globe media not always involving the u.s., though certainly the risk of increasing globally. based on our fiscal picture. the point that i would want to make is the budget deal requires us to deal with a full deck of cards and those people who keep wanting to take things off the table. when i say a full deck of cards, that includes defense participating in deficit reduction. this cannot be in the case of defense a sledgehammer approach. it's going to take a long line of dealing with these issues overtime to give the defense department time and they can make in my view very significant changes in the budget, but doing it in a way that does not damage our security. doing it abruptly as the fiscal cliff does or in a very compressed time frame is not only inefficient and dangerous to security in our s. my final point is that they are missing an element in this town is primarily political will, and i say that with regard to both political parties and the solution that has to be forthcoming in the weeks ahead and the months ahead will require the leaders to first of all put our nation fi
stability and security of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interest. and, of course, the keys to success will be innovative access agreements, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases, efficient force posture initiatives that will maximize the dollars that we are given to stand. and it also is by putting our most capable forces forward, as was her newest most advanced equipment to ensure we effectively operate with our allies and partners across a wide range of operations as we work together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep these opening remarks at little shorter than the last time, so i can get to your questions. so i'd like to finish up with a couple of thoughts. the rebalanced is based on a strategy of collaboration and cooperation. thought containment. and that the united states is a pacific power that will remain a pacific power, and we at pacom look forward to doing our part to keep asia is difficult full, peaceful and secure for decades to come. thank you. >> will take our first question writer spent admiral, thank you for meeting
this miscalculation. people say, well, you know, mutual assured destruction marched between the u.s. and the soviet union. well, if you look at the history, it actually came very, very close a couple of times, particularly on three occasions. one was the cuban missile crisis . another time was actually less well-known, during the yom kippur war. but in the jerusalem post, a book written about this describing how the american and soviet navies were circling watching each other, get so tired, they almost made a mistake and pulled the nuclear trigger and each other. and finally, just sort of more innocent mistakes, if you look at an example in the 1980's, boris yeltsin, the president of russia, the norwegians had a zero weather rocket that they launched in the direction of russia. then notify the russians, but this time the notification got lost in the mail. the russian generals came and said, look, apparently somebody has lost something in us across our horizon. this is an american nuclear attack you have to miss the launch or russia will be obliterated with no shots back. thankfully was sober that d
hospitalized since early december. senator inouye who served in the u.s. house in 1959 before being elected to the senate in 1962 was serving his ninth term in office after winning their reelection in 2010 was 75% of the vote. a winner of the distinguished service cross for heroism, senator inouye lost his right arm in combat during world war ii. he later received a medal of honor along with another number of japanese american soldiers. from bill clinton in 2000. here is a conversation with the senator from 2008. >>> welcome to the latest interview in the united states capitol historical society's series of oral history interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners with a deeper
speaker yesterday at the national press club. he discussed the future of the u.s. and military in afghanistan. also if automatic budget cuts take effect next month. this is an hour. >> good afternoon and welcome to the national press club. my name is theresa werner and by the 105th president of the national press club. [applause] we are the world's leading social organization for journalists committed to our profession's future through our programming and events such as this while fostering a free press worldwide. for more information about the national press club, please visit our web site at www.press.org. to donate to the programs offered to the public through our national press club journalism institute, please visit press.org/institute. on behalf of members worldwide, i'd like to welcome the speaker and those of you attending today's event. our head table includes tests of the speaker as well as working journalists to our club members. and if you hear applause and our audience we would note that members of the general public are attending, so it isn't necessarily evidence
in. where they're in a fundamental mistakes that the u.s. president made? >> you know, i think on the management of this issue like i said we almost ran into a couple of issues here. but we kept it on the road. i have to say, because you know i think about the last 20 years, 30 years of u.s. foreign-policy, in particular in the last 10 years. i to call it the disciplining impact of working within the alliance. we were genuinely, because this was an alliance, both on the negotiating side because in order to deploy in these countries, government suppression had to take ownership for the negotiation. they weren't going to be sitting at the negotiating table but there was a group that nato called a special consulted the group that enabled these people to go back, the governments in question and say you are part of this process. we are not we are not going to let those americans do these things and i have to tell you there were so many people in the reagan administration that were unhappy hearing the state department arguments over and over again. we can do that because it will disr
, which exists as both an adversary to certain u.s. interests and a fellow traveler sharing mutual goals and vulnerabilities on others. the ongoing challenge will be for the united states to disce discern, sometimes issue by issue, whether china is an adversary or a partner. and this calibration will impact america's relations with the rest of asia and may ultimately determine prospects for war or peace in this world. while visiting indonesia, thailand and the philippines in october, i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that the ten countries comprising asean represent now the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage to the circumstances with china. we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursuit prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen america's economic growth. more broadly, we face the specter of global resource constraints, especially deficiencies of energy and food that can stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. we have made startling gains
. >> iran, the u.s. drone they claim they shot down. do you have information on that? the navy said it's not theirs, perhaps a cia drone. i don't know. anything that you can tell us about that? >> i can tell you we have no evidence that the iranian claims you cite are true. i'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning about the type of uav, but, again, no evidence that the claims are true. >> how do you view, though, the fact they have shot some drone -- >> again, we have no evidence to hear the claims are true. i'm not going to comment on something about which we have no evidence in its truthfulness. yes? >> jay, thanks. i want to go back to what the president asked in the interview with bloomberg. during the negotiations with speaker boehner, a year ago, he was willing to consider increasing the eligibility age for medicare recipients and slowing benefits for entitlements, and he said he was willing to look at anything that strengthens our system. can you clarify, are those prams that could strengthen the system, is that what he was signaling? >> i will say a couple things t
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13